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20120930
20121008
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KRCB (PBS) 20
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to latino kids and african americans and that they were showing up in school way behind their peers as a result because as you mentioned maybe the education system failed them. then doing very poorly, higher drop out rates, all that sort of thing. what do you think about the position that have article? >> i read the article i thought it was garbage, i think there were a lot of assumptions made that just don't match reality. i mean, i attended university and i think affirmative action enabled me to fully integrate in to the full pro
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legistors get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "ecial interestdo and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in
, that we'll be better off. i've got a different view. i think we've got to invest in education and training. i think it's important for us to develop new source of energy here in america. that we change our tax code to make sure that we're helping small business and companies that where investing here in the united states. that we take some of the money we're saving as we weend down two wars to rebuild america. and that we reduce our deficit in a balanced way that allows us to make these critical investments. now, it ultimately going to be up to the voters, to you, which path we should take. are we going to double down on the top-down economic policies that helped to get us into this mess, or do we embrace a new economic patriotism that says america does best when the middle class does best, and i'm looking forward to having that debate. >> lehrer: governor romney, two minutes. >> thank you, jim. it's an honor to be here with you, and i appreciate the chance to be with the president. i'm pleased to be at the university of denver, appreciate their welcome, and also the presidential commissio
that america has a third world infrastructure. we need to spend more on education. one of the concerns that i raise in my book is america has become the country with the least equality of opportunity of any of the advanced industrial countries. >> equality of opportunity meaning -- >> that the life chances of a child are more dependent on the education and income of his parents than in any of the other advanced countries for which there is data. and the main reason for this is lack of equality, of opportunity for education. for a good education. >> and when you look at education statistics in the u.s. compared to rest of the industrialized world, we fell to what? >> we're way in the middle. we-- we are not at the top of the league any more by a long shot. we need to spend more on technology if we want to be competitive in the world. >> why didn't we do this in the stimulus program that was enacted? >> i think we should have done more. i think the -- >> was it commit political compromise that prevented the stimulus program being what might have met your approval. >> it was partly a political c
nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and i
that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of positive news coming from construction. but in a lot of the business services and goods-producing industries and manufacturing, things look pretty soft at this moment. >> reporter: in addition, 2,000 temporary jobs were cut, which is often looked at as a barameter of future employment. but, the average work week rose to 34-and a half hours... and employers typically boost the workload of existing staff.. before taking on new workers. with all these cross-currents, the employment situation may be but the bottom line seems to be that the economy is improving, but not nearly as quickly as most people would like. >> we lost so many jobs during the great recession, that we are slowly clawing our way out of that hole.. but still at a pretty slow pace." >> reporter: the government's next jobs report will come out just 4 days before the presidential election. by then, many voters will have made up their minds. so, the impact of today's data may be more political.. than economic. erika miller, nbr, ny >> reporter: the employment r
and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized, individual and oup retirement products. that's why we're you're your retirement company. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernathy. good to have you with us. aas p as protests continued debates were front and center at the opening session of the united nations general assembly in new york. in a strong speech, president obama again condemned the video as an insult to muslims and all americans, but america rejects it. >> given the power and faith and passion that it can inflame, the strongest weapon is not repression, it's more speech. the voices of tolerance that rally against bigotry and lift up the values of uderstanding and mumpl respect. >> he called on world leaders to speak out forcefully against extremism. >> na brand of politics that pits east against west and south against north and muslims against christians and hindus and jews can't deliver on the promise of freedom. >> many arab and muslim leaders renewed their can calls for a u.n. resolution to banal defamation of religion. egypt's new president morsi
the vows. he's a groom to be. he'll marry his japanese girlfriend next year. he was educated mainly in britain. now he works in tokyo at his mother's korean restaurant. he taught himself japanese and is fluent. marrying a nonkorean seemed natural. >> translator: as a korean citizen living and working in japan who chose to marry a japanese woman, i feel the way the dispute is handled on tv is exaggerated. >> reporter: more than 40,000 korean japanese couples get married every year, but people didn't welcome the unions as much years ago as they do now. he's a third generation korean living in japan. the japanese colonized from the early 1900s until the end of world war ii. that bitter history kept people apart. he decided to feature the wedding ceremony to show how things have changed. >>ranslator: the old generation used to strongly oppose japanese and koreans getting married. that is not the case anymore for the younger generation. >> reporter: he's long hoped the bond between japanese and koreans become stronger. he supports the cross culture marriages. on the day of the wedding ce
of access to good, healthy foods. >> reporter: government can advise and educate the public about healthy eating, but ultimately it can't demand people change their eating habits or force supermarkets to locate in poorer neighborhoods. >> maybe you have to do something innovative. maybe you actually have a mobile supermarket, grocery, that comes into a community. so on wednesday night when the bookmobile comes and the community health facility comes on wheels, the grocery comes on wheels as well so people can get access to the food that they need. >> reporter: nat turner says the national discussion about food has to move beyond "food security" -- whether or not the poor have enough food to eat -- to something broader. >> a more important conversation is to talk about food justice where people not only have access to it, but they can afford it, where the food is grown sustainably so it's not full of chemicals and all that kind of stuff. that the money for the food stays in the community, and so moving, bringing it up a notch from food security is bringing it up to food justice, right? >>
government, for instance, has been making big cuts in education, health, and social welfare, but at the same time, more people are losing their jobs and do not know how to pay for their food each day. one man has found his own way of making sure he does not need to rely on others for help. >> i am technical dughtsm by profession. i am 40 years old and since easter, i have been working as a shoe shiner here. >> his work for engineering firms and four architects. he has designed web pages for publishing companies, but when he lost his most important customer at the end of the year, he faced joining the hordes of other unemployed people in spain. but he was not entitled to benefit because he had been self-employed. >> i do not want to be dependent on anyone -- not on family, not on friends. i wanted to be able to put food on the table, put a roof over my head. i came up with this idea. i am quite content with it. july and august were really difficult months. i hardly earned anything, but christmas is a while off yet. if i can buy a nugget then, that no carry on. >> unions if he can afford the t
education piece that will continue to be rolled out. you know, and the fact that poll workers can actually still ask people for i.d.s although they don't have to produce it in order to get a regular ballot. we think at the end of the day that the pennsylvania state nstitutioneallyoes prevent this kind of law from going forward because as the supreme court said it really wantedded to see, you know, make sure that there's no disenfranchisement. we think that there was 760,000 people that the state estimated were going to be impacted by this law. in fact, they have won because they will have access to the ballot in november. >> suarez: representative metcalfe, when is the next biggie leches in pennsylvania after november 6? and will you have time to answer some of ms. browne dianis' complaints? >> we don't need to answer her complaints. the constituion is very clear. this is the responsibility of the legislature. it stands within our area of responsibility to set this process up for the election and ultimately the way the courts have written these decisions, written these opinions it's very c
didn't solve that problem. his problem with educated women voters. those issues didn't come up in this debate, he didn't solve any problems with those people. you think about just in terms of the battle ground states, there's going to be a tightening, we're seeing a tightening already. but the obama people, we have a swing state possible this morning from nbc and "wall street journal" president obama ahead by 8 points in ohio. it remains the case tomorrow as it was earlier today that president obama, i don't see how, maybe that poll tightens a little bit but that's still a massive problem for mitt romney. how you win the presidency as a republican without ohio which has never happened in the history of the republic. this was an important debate and mitt romney did himself a lot of good but the one thing the obama taking comfort in they are still looking at those problems he has with specific voter groups that give president obama an advantage in the battle ground states and will continue to give him an advantage in terms of how to get to 270 which is ultimately what this is abo
't work, and to the collapsing national education system and national infrastructure. >> suarez: he argues that instead of bettering the fortunes of venezuela's 29 million citizens, chavez has institutionalized the corruption he himself once campaigned against, while providing empty revolutionary rhetoric that's polarized the country and scared off foreign investors. >> ( translated ): in 14 years, the president has been playing the same chess moves. nothing has changed at all. all the streets are damaged. socialism of the 21st century. >> suarez: today in caracas, the country's capital, price controls have led to shortages of many goods, and of housing, as the government's tried to rein in an inflation rate among the highest in the world. despite a drastic reduction of those living in extreme poverty, and a robust welfare state financed by oil revenue, 27% of the population still lives in poverty. power outages, as during this 2010 press conference, are frequent. and violent crime has soared over the past decade, as drug- related homicides and kidnappings grow. >> ( translated ): crime is
of battalion and above. so basically we continue the strategy to train and educate afghan security forces. there's no train-- attempt at strategy. >> rose: when the french going out? >> well, some of them have left already. some of the combat troops. but i have to add the french stay committed. they continue to contribute in different ways. among other things they contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan. >> rose: but combat soldiers will be leaving by the end of 2013? >> actually by the end of this year. so they are in the process now of withdrawing but they still contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan so they stay committed until the end of 2014. >> rose: it's a presence but not a combat presence then. >> the same goes for the coalition partners. we have different tasks within and some people contribute trainers, others contribute combat troops. >> rose: okay. at the beginning of 2014 how many nations will do you think will be contributing combat troops? >> we don't know yet because that will very much depend on the security situation on the ground.
that we haven't adjusted, or we don't create an educational system that really signals to students and provides them incentives and information that this is where the jobs are. >> reporter: but thrillist and zocdoc aren't giving up, doing all they can to attract workers and make them feel at home. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we'll continue our job retraining coverage with a look at gowill industries. it's the nation's largest non- profit dedicated to training workers and finding them jobs. and speaking of jobs, tomorrow, the government's monthly jobs report is out-- what it could mean for investors and the presidential election. >> susie: healthy food may soon be coming to a corner near you. two former mcdonald's executives launched lyfe kitchen last year in palo alto, california. now, they plan to take the restaurant and "it's good for you" menu nationwide. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: lyfe kitchen opened in the heart of silicon valley a year ago. lyfe, an acronym for "love your food everyday," serves up burgers, fish tacos, breakfast sandwiche
, and it is about efficiency. >> and market education? >> it can be, look for example, in retrospect, it is obvious, the banks need a higher capital assets. >> right. >> that requires regulation. >> and higher capital requirements? >> ye they did. and the systemic risks were far too buying and you need to regulate properly to do that and in the uk we are trying to get a greater separation between the retail side of banking and the investment side of banking. so look, the lesson of 2008, market reform is essential, under regulated markets have a tendency to crash. but let's not think that somehow that means that an old-fashioned state is going to be the answer. i mean, let's give you an example which may be to american eyes is challenging. we have a national health service. >> right. which. >> had one for a while. >> >> tax funded, universal service for all britains use it. we know we need to reform that, we need to reform it so that we get much greater responsibility of citizens as well as clinicians because we know that in diabetes or asthma self management -- >> what is wrong with it in is it th
, they are obviously well educated people with a kind of refinement about them, they aren't sloppy in any way, obnoxious in any way, they use firm language but both basically strong people, in the accomplishment, it was probably a very good pick but the romney that came in last night i would say you were right a couple of minutes ago, that romney was not predictable, he came in so strong and so in charge that he basically took over the room and i felt he was sufficient on that stage meaning the president didn't need to be on there for romney to put on the show or jim lehrer, it was romney control of that space and physical control of that space which was so dominant, i don't think we have seen anything like it before. >> rose:. >> in probably a presidential debate. >> rose: i also heard this was not a new romney in the context of have i seen him before. >> yes, mike barnicle saw him in the race for governor when he did win that against shannon o'brien and he has put on that performance but i moderated one of the debates the last time time around at the reagan library, he was good but wasn't
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)